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After spending a week or so in Thailand with Brian Peacock filming for the next DC China clip, I joined up with Patrik Wallner (VisualTraveling) and Tobias Ulbrich (TeamAquarius.biz) for a nine day adventure across Myanmar.

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We flew into Yangon, where you can visit the Shwedagon Pagoda, which is over 2600 years old, apparently making it the oldest pagoda in the world and according to lengend; encased within it are 8 hairs from the Buddha!

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How to get cold water.

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A human elephant.

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A 10 hour bus ride later, and we’ve arrived in the ancient city of Bagan, home to over 3000 temples/pagodas according to a man we met who said he works for the archeological department of restoration.

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Patrik Wallner and his impressive abode.

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This is how they keep the weeds from overtaking the temples.

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Workers in the fields.

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Strangely, the majority of the workers were female. Even at one point, we saw a man riding a trike filled with shovels and getting pushed by two women.

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We met these workers coming back from sunrise, as they were walking to the fields. Even though we couldn’t understand each other, they were very friendly and even offered us some of their lunch that they had packed! If you ever go to Bagan, the tomato salads there are the best in all of Myanmar…. if not the world!

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A man and his cow. This was on the side of the road, at a home where the family was making candies, medicine and alcohol from toddy palm and peanuts. The cow is used to help grind up peanuts to produce peanut oil, which is used in a lot of Burmese cooking, especially so in the previously mentioned tomato salad.

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We took a day trip to Mount Popa, a little over an hours drive from Bagan. 777 steps to the top, must be climbed barefoot and mindful of the monkeys and their shit everywhere.

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This was taken in the lacquerware-making village of Mynkaba, located inbetween Old Bagan and New Bagan. Families live in bamboo huts as they produce lacquerware to sell in the markets. The lacquerware can be found all over Bagan at stores, but we met a very friendly family in this village that invited us into their home to purchase from directly.

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Behind the village was a river with very little water due to the dry season they were experiencing. In the background you can see three field workers crossing to the otherside to go home, and further on a pagoda cuts through the landscape. Who needs a canoe?

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Friendly postcard hawkers! They go to school during the week and sell postcards on the weekends to try and make money to help their family survive! Not surprisingly, their english is very good and when I asked them what they wanted to do when they grew up, the girls exclaimed they wanted to be an English speaking tour guide or a wife!

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And we’re off to…

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Inle Lake, located in the Shan province of Burma and home to a shitload of wildlife, the best samosas I’ve ever had, and amazing Shan noodles with tofu gravy!

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We took a boat tour on the lake which included sunrise, tour of a lotus-weaving factory, tobacco factory, morning markets, and a Jumping Cats Monastery (where the cats no longer jump).

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We rented bicycles and rode around the lake. Two hours later, we realized we didn’t even make it halfway, so we hired a ferry to bring us back closer to our hotel before it got too dark to ride.

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A lady washes her clothes in the lake as the house in the background crumbles further into it.

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A nun bids us farewell as we make our way to the bustling city of Mandalay!

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Fishing for dinner!

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Awesome tree swing!

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The sun sets as a monk poses on the U Bein bridge, the worlds longest teak bridge! Myanmar is a gorgeous country full of friendly people and delicious food! I hope to be back again soon!

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